Balancing work with passion

If someone were to bring up at a social occasion the topic of work – which does occur quite often, we must admit – and talk about doing things they are passionate about, you may find that for every one of such a person, there is another who would be adamant that sometimes you simply just have to knuckle down and do what’s available. It may be an age thing – after all, those who insist that you need to follow your passions may be younger individuals who still have decades of working life ahead of them. And what is wrong to want to do something that you would like, something that would sustain you for four or more decades of work?

But I am reminded of an older family member who once remarked rather cynically that one should forget about doing things that you like, simply because it is called work, and “work isn’t meant to be enjoyable.” No one likes work. The word work implies effort, movement, will and strength to drag yourself out of inertia into impetus. And translating that into action is effortful in itself. Why waste time on a movement or activity you do not believe in?

That lust to do something you are passionate about is a good thing, but it must be balanced against the need to earn a stable living and approached with caution. If what you are passionate about is a job that does not require much entry experience (such as singing, arguably), then you will have many people competing with you for your job. Singers are forever competing with others for the buying money of Joe Public. So being passionate about something may be a good idea, but balance that with a slight resignation to do may not necessarily be thoroughly enjoyable, but which would give you something to live on!

The music composer Carl Czerny was a link between the older Classical style of Beethoven and the expressionist Franz Liszt. Just as his music blends what seems like two opposing forces of expression and form, perhaps the ideal blend, in this situation, is one that you can derive some sense of satisfaction from, while still earning a wage. You can read more about Czerny in the N8 Piano Teacher blog.

But in this football context, what would be the ideal job? It may belong to Liverpool throw-in coach Thomas Gronnemark, who admits he has possibly weirdest job in football.