Population growth and the need for new skills

The current rate of world population growth has reason to give us cause for alarm. Every fifteen to twenty years, the world population increases by a billion people. That is the staggering reality of the world population growth. In fact, in the year 1999, it was estimated that the world population surpassed six billion then. It is difficult to forecast populations exactly of course, and as population growth is a derivative rate from the population itself, growth is also difficult to estimate.

Population growth is difficult to estimate because factors such as natural disasters may skew the number of deaths each year through earthquakes, typhoons and famine. Other factors such as migration, and when census in different countries are taken may also affect data. (If for example, a million people in the United Kingdom migrate due to Brexit into Europe, and the census dates between the United Kingdom and Europe are different, a million people could lapse in between somewhere.)

At this current rate of growth the world population is expected to reach eleven billion by the turn of the century. By 2200 we would double the existing world population. The world population growth at its current rate is hence unsustainable. We must take measures to curb it, it appears. And why? If you think about it, at its current level there are already people who suffer from poverty and hunger and do not have enough to eat. The world’s resources cannot feed so many people at its current level; how is it going to feed an additional billion or two?

It is unsurprising then that there have been greater publicity towards a move towards less meat, more vegetarian and even vegan diet. Meat such as beef from cows accounts for nearly a quarter of greenhouse emissions. If we were to reconsider our diet, some reason that it just might allow us to produce enough to feed a growing world population.

Population growth also means a drive towards accumulating more skills for employment. When there are people than there are jobs, it means greater competition, and a need to be more skilled and creative in promoting one’s skills and knowledge. If you were a footballer, for example, you need to have more football skills on the pitch, but also to know how to market yourself. It is no point being the best footballer if you do not take advantage of the opportunities to make income through sales of jerseys, advertising, promoting products and off the pitch.

So that is the case for footballers, but what about the rest of us? We could look at developing more general skills. For example, just because you are an accountant does not mean you can’t have musical interests. You may be an actor, but have good computing skills, Or if you are an artist, there is nothing stopping you from doing other non-artistic courses in your free time. These skills may come in handy and give you the edge over someone else with the same qualifications. The hardest part is finding time to practice what seems like irrelevant skills to the job, but developing these may be a good way to stand out in an ever-populated world!

Dressing for the job

Can your style of dress affect your chances of promotion at work? Some people claim that this could be true. If you dress to impress, and dress for the job you aim to get, you might find you have put yourself in the frame when the time comes when a position is being vacated. In fact, some suggest that you even dress like the person who you could be potentially replacing!

Of course this may be something for which the converse may be true. If there is a job opening within your organisation, and the person vacating the position is not well-liked, wear a style that is different and offers a new perspective. Or else you will never get the position because the person in mind is someone who is different, and you will remind the interview board too much of the status quo!

Will the trend for outfit rental extend beyond special occasions and into the commonplace? This is the question to which many are trying to answer, and where opportunists may sense there is a business area ripe for commercial exploitation. And just who exactly will form the majority of the target market? It is believed that the aspirational and ambitious thirty-somethings will make up the largest share of the market, while those in the previous and later decades will form a smaller but equally significant minority. But why is that age group more susceptible to be tapped?

Sociologists believe that those that make up that age bracket in the workforce will be looking to move up before it is too late. Most people in their twenties will spend time choosing the job that gives them the career they are after, and hence they will be job hopping. As their choice of career stabilises, towards the end of their late twenties and early twenties, they will be thinking less horizontally -in other words, thinking less about different careers – and thinking more vertically; about ascending within their career. They will be coveting the higher managerial positions, the ones with the greater responsibilities and salaries, so that they are well positioned within the organisation before they reach the crucial forties.

The forties are crucial for a couple of reasons. One is that it is normally expected that people in managerial positions will be at that age, when they have accumulated some work experience and life experience. Those in their forties are the ones bossing about and lording it over the newly graduated and those starting out.

An organisation is not going to put a young member into a managing role because they are career trialling and it would not work to invest all that time in someone and train them and have them leave. And if they don’t leave, training and promoting them too soon will mean that as they progress within the organisation they are going to command higher salaries. So the first importance of the forties is that it is the age where managing positions become more open and available. And those in their thirties are going to be jostling for these opportunities, doing what it takes to get them; these includes dressing for the intended job to get noticed.

So some career advice as you approach the forties is to dress for the job you want. Look to attain a managing position. You might want to consider renting outfits if the job requires you look smart. Look at football manager Antonio Conte when he was in charge of slick Chelsea – always with his suits on. If you are football manager of a blue-collar club, then maybe a tracksuit isn’t that out of place either. The classical music composer Joseph Haydn was often derided for his clothes as a young boy, yet when he worked in the courts of Esterhazy, from his mid-thirties, his style of dress would remain impressive for the decades he spent in the managing position of music maestro. (You can learn more about Haydn from the Piano Teacher N10 website. Find out why his tomb has two skulls!)

Public relations lesson

All in all, it can be summarised as a poor week for Spurs and France football captain Hugo Lloris.

The goalkeeper was found guilty this week of a drink driving offence and fined. In addition, he will also be sanctioned by the club.

It is coincidental therefore to hear that he has sustained an injury and will be out five weeks.

One suspects that the announcement of the injury has been timed to manage the fallout of his drink driving actions.

The Tottenham public relations team have thought about it and certainly considered how to protect their club captain and key player.

By announcing that the goalkeeper has an injury, it gives him a reason for an enforced absence. The club can sanction him internally with a ban for the same period, so he serves the ban without any public loss of face. Lloris gets punished by the club, but faces no speculation caused by the absence on the pitch during the time of his punishment.

And if the press continue to write about him, the Tottenham team will focus on his injury.

And when he returns to the football team, the media team will focus on how he will have returned after his injury, not after his drink driving ban.

Fans will realise he has been disciplined, but it will have been hush hush and a low key affair.

Lloris himself will appreciate that his internal disciplinary action will have been minimised in exposure.

Michel Vorm will man the sticks in the absence of Lloris. Vorm knows he gets the next five weeks to play with the first team.

By suspending the player internally, the club save on a few weeks wages.

Lloris gets a rest after his World Cup exploits.

The third choice keeper gets to be on the sub bench.

It is a win win situation for all involved.

This was supposed to be a bad time for the Tottenham stopper, but if you look carefully at how it has been managed, the fallout has been contained.

What a lesson in public relations!