Public relations lesson

All in all, it can be summarised as a poor week for Spurs and France football captain Hugo Lloris.

The goalkeeper was found guilty this week of a drink driving offence and fined. In addition, he will also be sanctioned by the club.

It is coincidental therefore to hear that he has sustained an injury and will be out five weeks.

One suspects that the announcement of the injury has been timed to manage the fallout of his drink driving actions.

The Tottenham public relations team have thought about it and certainly considered how to protect their club captain and key player.

By announcing that the goalkeeper has an injury, it gives him a reason for an enforced absence. The club can sanction him internally with a ban for the same period, so he serves the ban without any public loss of face. Lloris gets punished by the club, but faces no speculation caused by the absence on the pitch during the time of his punishment.

And if the press continue to write about him, the Tottenham team will focus on his injury.

And when he returns to the football team, the media team will focus on how he will have returned after his injury, not after his drink driving ban.

Fans will realise he has been disciplined, but it will have been hush hush and a low key affair.

Lloris himself will appreciate that his internal disciplinary action will have been minimised in exposure.

Michel Vorm will man the sticks in the absence of Lloris. Vorm knows he gets the next five weeks to play with the first team.

By suspending the player internally, the club save on a few weeks wages.

Lloris gets a rest after his World Cup exploits.

The third choice keeper gets to be on the sub bench.

It is a win win situation for all involved.

This was supposed to be a bad time for the Tottenham stopper, but if you look carefully at how it has been managed, the fallout has been contained.

What a lesson in public relations!

Team Breakdown

I know what you’re thinking.

You’re thinking that in a week with Champions League football, exciting comebacks galore, that much of what I’ll be writing about is either something out of one of the following teams:

Manchester City’s and their successive failings, losing three in a row

Liverpool and their Champions League success – now up to face Mo Salah’s old team, Roma

The decline of Barcelona and Messi

How Real Madrid nearly got tossed out by Juventus

How Juventus and Gigi Buffon’s career in the Champions League came to a sad run.

Actually, I’m talking about none of the above.

Aha! Wait a second. You think I’m going to write about Arsenal and how they nearly lost it in Moscow, how Arsene Wenger’s life flashed before his own very eyes.

Nope.

Instead I’m going to write about Tottenham.

Tottenham? You say. They haven’t done anything note worthy. They haven’t really been in the news for anything special.

Well, in fact, before tonight’s game against Man City, which saw the Spurs lose 3-1 at White Hart Lane, you could have predicted that the Spurs would lose. Really? One might have been forgiven in thinking the boys in white could have snatched one from the boys in blue, coming off a bad week for Manchester City, with successive losses at Liverpool, Manchester United (the enemy from town!) and then Liverpool again … maybe City were suffering from fatigue? What better to strike them while they were on a losing roll? Spurs might have fancied their chances.

Actually, it didn’t really matter who Spurs played. They could have played West Brom and lost. They could have played Southampton and lost. Heck, they could have played any team in the Premier League and not got a favourable result.

And you know why?

Because the Spurs are imploding.

Imploding? How so?

You can date it back to the game where Christian Eriksen, Spurs’ talisman over the recent two months, swung a ball in from the left corner of the field, which then slightly out of form striker Harry Kane claimed to have grazed his shoulder on the way in. The replays really were inconclusive, because if you watch the replays, the goal post is in the way right at the crucial moment that Kane claimed it brushed his shoulder. The Spurs striker swore on his daughter’s life that it had touched his shoulder and should have been awarded to him. During the game, the goal was credited to Eriksen but after a goals panel (all English) reviewed it, Kane got the nod.

What does it do for team spirit?

Really, Harry Kane should have let that one go. Sure, he is chasing Salah to be top scorer, and he wants to be the league’s top scorer three years in a row. But he should understand that Salah is in exceptional form, and is likely to run away with the award. Would you bet against Mo Salah to win the Player of the Year? Not even Kevin de Bruyne is in with a chance now. It’s all Salah, Salah, Salah.

Kane’s whingeing about how the goal was his instead of Eriksen’s really is unsporting. What do you think it did to his team and team mates?

To also swear on your daughter’s life that a ball grazed your shoulder in mid flight and ended up in a net is really a case of a selfish player putting only himself in his own frame.

If you wish to score, seek to make your teammates better first. Then when the opposition clamps down on them , you will have your chance. Look at Salah against Bournemouth.

But for Tottenham, unfortunately, every one knows the road will pass through Harry Kane. And his team mates feel obliged to help him. Stop Kane, and you stop Tottenham winning. They are too focussed in this selfish dream to think about winning now.

Which is why they are imploding.

 

Sharpening their Spurs in Europe

It’s not been a bad week for Tottenham Hotspur, has it? Even though the North London derby win brought them up to third in the table, before wins by Chelsea and Liverpool brought them sliding down to fifth again – out of the Champions League spots, they showed their mettle in the current Champions League campaign with a 2-2 away draw at Juventus.

The away side were slow to settle and gave away a 2-0 lead inside of ten minutes. You could have said that Juve deliberately targeted the Spurs backline, with youth in its side, and Gonzalo Higuain was on his way to a hat trick before he had even warmed up sufficiently. But Spurs showed their mettle and fought back slowly, first with Harry Kane slipping past Gigi Buffon to slot it, and then Christian Eriksen rounding a free kick past the wall to earn the Spurs an important advantage in the competition.

The 2-2 away draw means that Juventus are on the back foot on away goals – remember that after 90 minutes away goals count as double. The away goals rule was implemented to stop sides playing defensive football and hoping to make it through on penalties. It has been one of the more positive changes to the game to make it more exciting. Another has been the back pass rule – remember when a goalkeeper could pick up the ball from his own players and defences just kept rolling the ball back to the goalie? (You’d have to be a certain age to recall that, actually.) A change still not quite well-implemented yet is VAR.

Coming back to the game, the 2-2 draw in Turin at the Allianz Stadium means that Juventus have to go on the offensive. Spurs only need a 1-1 draw or better to progress. But it would be a mistake to simply expect to sit back and defend. Juventus with their front line of Higuain and Mandzukic et al are very good at scoring, and if you were behind that’s when their defence clamps down on you.

That was not necessarily the case yesterday, but should make for good football in the return leg. Spurs are definitely the better team to watch in North London; have been for the last few years – if you haven’t already realised that!