VARdy denied by VAR

International week is here. The week where a series of friendlies, decided by FIFA, sees teams try out their different players and formations. England played the Netherlands a couple of days ago and yesterday played Italy. Jamie Vardy scored in the early stages of the game and would have been on course for the winning goal had a penalty not been awarded to the Azzuri via VAR. So that is how Vardy was denied the chance to be the match winner.

England manager Gareth Southgate was disappointed with the decision, and for good reason too. James Tarkowski, the England defender who has had a brilliant season marshalling the backlines at Burnley, along with goalkeeper Nick Pope (who has yet to play a friendly), conceded the penalty in the later stages of his debut. What a debut it would have been for the centre back. And despite the fact that England in their last eight games have had five wins and three draws, Southgate would have taken six and two if he could.

Italy did not have much to play for, having not qualified for the World Cup. Can you imagine a World Cup without Italy? The country that is shaped like a boot not going to the World Cup? But just as transfer windows are good opportunities to showcase skills to the Premier League team scouts, so are friendlies. The Azzuri had a quiet first half and England seemed in control until the late penalty.

“If you look at the replay, Tarkowski stood on his foot but it was in the act of running and he was already going down.” Southgate said. Tarkowski himself conceded – like a true Burnley player not afraid to man up – that he had stood on the opposing player’s foot, but it may have been a case of 50-50 and the referee chose to give it against England.

VAR has not really had a satisfactory debut and is still rough around the edges. I have been calling for so many times now, stop the referee reviewing each decision. Just let the referee control the game, and give managers a challenge in each half, or two per game. Once they use it it is gone, and if there is undisputable evidence that the decision was incorrect then it is overturned. If not, the referee’s decision stands. Just like in the NFL. The game is more likely to flow because of the relative lack of stoppages (no more than four a game), and if the referee made a wrong decision then it is not his fault, it is the fault of the manager for not challenging it (or not managing his use of challenges wisely).

It really is that simple, but of course the media loves VAR and its problems because it fills column inches. But for a reader, it is just boring to see teams going var, var, var when a result doesn’t go their way.